“The source of our strength is the person we know ourselves to be.”

Grit by Angela Duckworth

“Is passion the right word to describe sustained, enduring devotion? Some might say I should find a better word. Maybe so. But the important thing is the idea itself: Enthusiasm is common. Endurance is rare.” (p 58)

“What I mean by passion is not just that you have something you care about. What I mean is that you care about that same ultimate goal in an abiding, loyal, steady way. You are not capricious. Each day, you wake up thinking of the questions you fell asleep thinking about. You are, in a sense, pointing in the same direction, ever eager to take even the smallest step forward that to take a step to the side, towards some other destination.” (p 64)

“On any long journey, detours are to be expected.” (p 74)

“It’s progress just clarifying your goals, and the extent to which they are – or aren’t – aligned toward a single passion of supreme importance. It’s also progress to better understand how well you’re currently able to persevere in the face of life’s rejection slips.” (p 78)

“First comes interest. Passion begins with intrinsically enjoying what you do. Every gritty person I’ve studied can point to aspects of their work they enjoy less than others, and most have to put up with at least one or two chores they don’t enjoy at all. Nevertheless, they’re captivated by the endeavour as a whole.” (p 91)

“While it is naive to think that any of us could love every minute of what we do, I believe the thousands of data points in those meta-analyses, which confirm the common sense intuition that interest matters. Nobody is interested in everything, and everyone is interested something. So matching your job to what captures your attention and imagination is a good idea. It may not guarantee happiness and success, but it sure helps the odds.” (p 99)

“For now, what I hope to convey is that experts and beginners have different motivational needs. At the start of an endeavour, weened encouragement and freedom to figure out what we enjoy. We need small wins. We need applause. Yes, we can handle a tincture of criticism and corrective feedback. Yes, we need to practice. But not too much and not too soon. Rush a beginner and you’ll bludgeon their budding interest. I’s ver, very hard to get that  back once you do.” (p 108)

“If you’d like to follow your passion but haven’t yet fostered one, you must begin at the beginning: discovery. Ask yourself a few simple questions: What do Iike to think about? Where does my mind wander? What do I really care about?… As you have even a general direction in mind, you must trigger your nascent interests. Do this by going out into the world and doing something. To you graduates wringing their hands over what to do, I say, Experiment! Try! You’ll certainly learn more than if you don’t.” (p 115)

“In other words, deliberate practice is for preparation, and flow is for performance.” (p 132)

“Nobody wants to show you the hours and hours of becoming. They’d rather show the highlight of what they’d become.” (p 135)

“Each of the basic requirements of deliberate practice is unremarkable: A clearly defined stretch goal. Full concentration and effort. Immediate and informative feedback. Repetition with reflection and refinement. But how many hours of practice do most people accomplish that checks all four of these boxes?” (p 138)

“At its core, the idea of purpose is the idea that what we do matters to people other than ourselves.” (p 145)

“Optimists, Marty soon discovered, are just as likely to encounter bad events as pessimists. Where they diverge is in their explanations: optimists habitually search for temporary and specific causes of their suffering, whereas pessimist assume permanent and pervasive causes are to blame.” (p 174)

“The bottom line of culture and grit is: If you want to be grittier, find a gritty culture and join it. If you’re a leader, and you want the people in your organisation to be grittier, create a gritty culture.” (p 245)

“Often our passion and perseverance do not spring from a cold, calculating analysis of the costs and benefits of alternatives. Rather, the source of our strength is the person we know ourselves to be.” (p 248)

“Anson (Dorrance) observed that ‘talent is common; what you invest to develop that talent is the critical final measure of greatness.’… Culture building, Anson said, is a matter of continuous experimentation.” (p 255)

GRIT – The Power of Passion and Perseverance. Angela Duckworth, 2016, published by Simon and Schuster Inc.

We provide our insights through quotes directly taken from books, articles, videos, info graphs and other media. We do not add, comment or reflect on the topics highlighted or represent the media in its intentions or as a whole. We hope to inspire you to dig deeper, discover and fall in love with your own eureka moments.

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